Attitude

Is the customer always right? Finally! The answer revealed!

Boom! And that’s how you do clickbaiting, kids.

Seriously though, I see this question get asked and answered a lot and since I’ve been in the hospitality business for 20 years and I’ve dealt with the business side of restaurants, the impact of social media, word of mouth, negative Yelp reviews, etc, etc….I have a strong opinion on this.

Is the customer always right? The short answer, no.

The long answer is customers and restaurants aren’t adversaries fighting to get food-for-free vs. low-cost/quick-bucks, respectively. Buyers and sellers have a relationship where each side trusts the other to exchange value that are (roughly) equal. In the case of restaurants, it’s food and a quality dining experience for cold, hard cash.

In all my years of serving and bartending, I never thought that customers who were complaining were trying to get a free meal out of me. But let me show you this diagram and make a few points.Diagram service

The main point, is clearly that the customer leaves happy. Although, yes, it might be incredibly challenging to influence a customer’s mood such that they go from upset to happy, it is possible. Don’t underestimate the power of…

-recognizing and acknowledging a customer’s issue

-apologizing humbly and sincerely

-offering to make restitution and fix any concerns

-and lastly, thanking the customer for bringing their issue to your attention and telling the customer you hope you can do business again, and further deepen your relationship.

Notice in the diagram that a dining experience is a process. The ideal one for a server is one where there is limited engagement because it’s unnecessary or intrusive. The ideal experience for a customer is one where they have the server’s attention whenever they need it during dinner.

Hospitality is a business whereby both the buyer and seller have prior expectations of how the interaction should play out. Both sides have had plenty of both positive and negative experiences to form a good idea of what the ideal dinner is. The job of the restaurant is to ensure that you communicate, clearly, the value of the dining experience and then deliver what you promised.

When a customer enters your restaurant, all the hard work of marketing has been completed already. The customer has made their purchase decision and there’s no need to understand the customer’s “black box”, consumer behaviours, buyer’s characteristics, and it’s too late to try to change and rebuild your marketing mix.

To sum up, when a customer looks at your menu and chooses their meal, remember the phrase “It’s 10 times more expensive to find a customer than to keep an existing customer”. Building a positive relationship with your customer is the cheapest option in the long run and well worth the food cost of a free dessert.

~Rob

Thanks for reading and I hope you find my information useful. As usual, if you have any questions or comments please feel free to comment below.

Be sure to follow me on Facebook and visit my website, robrosenblattconsulting.com to see what I can do for you.

 

Branding vs Marketing

Full credit to David Deal for this exceptional article. I haven’t seen a better example online yet. Mr. Deal provides a textbook example of branding and a reminder of the perils of failing to deliver on your promises and the expectations of your guests.

To sum it all up, branding is all about the experience between a consumer and your brand. It’s short, sweet, and simple. But sadly, it’s often ignored.

Too many times in restaurants I see the same old mistakes being made; promises that were made weren’t delivered, expectations weren’t met, and customers became angry, disillusioned and took to social media to voice their displeasure. That’s the “problem” with hyping up your restaurant; it sets up an expectation that certain ideals will be met.

For example, imagine seeing an Instagram picture of stale lettuce, tomatoes and vegetables on a sandwich. Now imagine that sandwich is from Subway, whose slogan is “Eat fresh”. Can you see the potential problem creeping up here? Subway made a promise of providing fresh ingredients and customers expected that. While, obviously, customers certainly expect to receive fresh ingredients in their meals, wouldn’t you agree that there’s nothing more egregious as having your entire restaurant brand built upon the one thing you failed to deliver? The fallout from this could be damaging to your restaurants’ reputation.

Stop this cycle before it starts!

If a staff member notices a problem starting, give them permission to “make it right”, right there on the spot. Encourage them to deliver an experience that customers can’t wait to share with their friends. If you promise that you’re the “fastest” pizza delivery, take steps to ensure that you are. Streamline your processes, prepare in advance for busy times, modernize your equipment, and/or hire more drivers. If you promise to always deliver “piping hot” pizza, invest in technology that will keep your pizzas hot while being delivered. Maybe there’s a new type of mobile oven or newfangled insulated sleeve out there! The point is, if your brand is built on a promise, that’s your number one priority.

Thanks for reading and I hope you find my information useful. As usual, if you have any questions or comments please feel free to comment below.

Be sure to follow me on Facebook and visit my website, robrosenblattconsulting.com to see what I can do for you.

~Rob

The Power of Politeness

Everyone knows the importance of a good first impression. And that means ensuring that your staff reflect your company values and present themselves professionally at all customer contact points.

And it’s important not to forget stressing the importance of manners. Many in the service industry forget that hospitality is a noun and related to the adjective hospitable which means to be cordial and receptive towards guests. Your staff should be encouraged to go above and beyond providing basic customer service, and to be polite, welcoming, attentive, humble and sympathetic to every guest at every opportunity.

Polite- The words your staff use convey the respect you have for your customer so make sure your staff use “may I, excuse me, please, and thank you” when appropriate.

Welcoming- The tone in which your staff engage guests is reflected in their behaviour. Your staff should be professional enough to “put their game faces on” and smile to guests, say hello when they arrive, introduce themselves, and make eye contact when speaking.

Attentive- Tell your staff to pay attention for clues about anniversaries or birthdays. The simple act of bringing out a dessert with a candle is huge for making a lasting memory and favourable impression. Make sure your staff pay attention to simple things they can do to make the dining experience better. Are your guests eating their meals or do they seem unhappy? If not, this could be a golden opportunity you might be missing.

Humble- Push your staff to be relatable and honest. While it’s important to acknowledge any shortcomings and be honest with guests, your staff should be gracious when accepting praise. There are no egos here. Providing an exceptional meal and a memorable experience is your job.

Sympathetic- Sympathy and understanding might seem generally out of place in the day-to-day workings of your business, but it’s a vital part of being relatable and ensuring your guests realize you’re invested in providing a positive experience.

Being polite is a critical part of building a positive brand image and can help to differentiate yourself from your competition. Wouldn’t you want your business to be known as the friendliest and nicest restaurant to go for dinner?

In short, work with your staff to help them provide personal, professional service. It’ll do wonders for your business and your server’s tips too.

Thanks for reading and I hope you find my information useful. As usual, if you have any questions or comments please feel free to comment below.

Be sure to follow me on Facebook and visit my website, robrosenblattconsulting.com to see what I can do for you.

~Rob